Landscaping with Roses

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated April 26, 2017)

Landscaping with roses is an interesting study in contrasts. First, while the plant itself is surprisingly versatile and hardy it still needs careful study to get the most out of it. In addition, entire libraries have been filled on the subject of properly filling a landscape with roses. In fact, depending on who you ask, roses are an absolute necessity when creating any garden. While this statement is a matter of opinion, what really isn't a matter of opinion is how easy roses are to care for. For this reason more than any other, roses should seriously be considered when you begin landscaping your garden or yard. In order to begin landscaping with roses, you simply need to consider these guidelines.

  • Purpose. Ask yourself the simple question of what are you going to be growing the roses for? This answer will go a long way to helping you landscape accordingly. For example, if you are going to be using the roses as a means to enhance the beauty of your home you will use different roses, and care for them differently, than if you are going to be growing roses as an herb for your cooking.
  • Location. Part of landscaping with roses is choosing the best possible location for planting. You will need to make sure that the location that you have chosen will receive the proper amount of sunlight (usually no less than six hours), and that it will fit in with your overall landscape design. While the rose bush may look absolutely beautiful under the windows at the front of your house, if they do not get enough sunlight they will quickly die.
  • Circulation. What many people don't realize is that roses will require a lot of air circulation. Typically the more circulation that you can give to your roses, the less likely they will be susceptible to diseases and insects. This means that roses should have plenty of space when planted near buildings, shrubs, or other items that can block off air circulation.
  • Type of roses. Many beginners will make the mistake of only choosing one type of rose when they are landscaping. This decision, often called monoculture, leads to problems if some unforeseen catastrophe appears. For example, some types of roses are not susceptible to the same pests or diseases as others. By having a diverse selection of roses in your landscape design you can make sure that all of your roses do not die of the same problems.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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