Easter Flowers

 

Depending on where you live in the world, there are quite a few options when choosing Easter flowers. For example, if you happen to live in Germany, the largest factor of whether a flower is an Easter flower is if it is red or not (something to do with the symbolism). While Easter flowers can be any early blooming spring flower that happens to catch your eye, there are a few flowers that you can safely consider "traditional" Easter flowers. These flowers are lilies, pussy willows, tulips, and daffodils. If you are interested in growing your own flowers, then make sure that you understand some of the basics so that you can get started.

  • Lilies. Lilies are a bulb plant that likes to be planted in a well mixed concoction of fertilizer and 12 inches of soil. While most require full sunlight, though some can get by on partial shade only. Place small bulbs no more than four inches deep, and no less than two; while the larger bulbs can be planted up to inches deep. In addition, each bulb should be planted no closer together than eight inches, though they can be planted up to 12 inches apart, and grouped no more than five plants together. Each bulb should be planted in the autumn, and mulched, to keep them from freezing.
  • Pussy willows. Technically speaking, pussy willows are a type of tree, though they have a tradition of being affiliated with Easter. Considering that pussy willows are a part of the willow family, they will require a lot of water to help them grow. That being said, pussy willows are going to be an extremely easy plant to grow, and don't really require any special needs besides plenty of water. These trees will grow so quickly, that you will need to pay special attention to make sure that they don't grow out of control.
  • Tulips. Tulips are another bulb plant that should be planted in the fall. The best times to plant tulips will usually be in late October or early November. When planting tulip bulbs they should be planted no less than one inch under the top of the soil, and no more than two inches deep. As with lilies, make sure that you mulch the area to help keep it safe over the cold winter months.
  • Daffodils. Daffodils, as with any other kind of bulb plant, these are supposed to be planted in the late fall. On the average, daffodils should be planted about four weeks before the ground freezes in your area. Unlike other kinds of bulb plants, daffodils are communal plants that like to do a lot of the work themselves, while also being close together. This means that they really don't mind being crowded. Keep in mind though that daffodils do require well drained soil, so you may need to test out your soil before planting.

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