Chinese Gardens

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated December 9, 2016)

Have you ever watched movies like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and just been totally blown away by the beauty and elegance of the landscapes? If so, then you have seen perhaps one of the best possible examples around of a Chinese garden. Many of the scenes in that movie were filmed in some of the most beautiful Chinese style gardens available. For example, I believe that the one of the most famous scenes of the film was filmed at the Zhishan Garden at the National Palace Museum in Taipei. The scene I am talking about is where the main characters where skipping across the water.

While it may be extremely expensive, and quite daunting, to try and have a garden of that scale it is entirely possible to have one that is smaller. In order to do this though, you will need to understand the four main elements of Chinese garden designs. Listed below are those four elements, as well as a brief description of each element. When combining each of these elements together, be sure to follow the precepts of Feng Shui in order to get the right effect.

  • Architecture. One of the biggest differences between Chinese gardens and other kinds of gardens is the role that architecture plays. In Chinese gardens, architecture is perhaps the largest or most important element to consider. There is usually some kind of central pavilion that all other aspects of the garden emanate from. In fact, it could be argued that the best view of a Chinese garden is actually from this central pavilion, where you can sit back and enjoy the beauty that surrounds you.
  • Rock. Rocks are used as means of enhancing the beauty of the Chinese garden not only because of their inherent beauty, but because of what they symbolize as well. Traditionally, the Taihu rock is sought after because it represents both wisdom and immortality, but it can only be procured from the Tai Lake, in Suzhou Provence. Whatever kind of rock is used needs to be artfully, and in balance with everything else.
  • Water. All Chinese gardens have some kind of water element incorporated into them. Usually this is done by having a central pond with a few streams that lead away from it. The reason for this is simple in that the inherent "softness" of the water will help to offset the harshness of the rocks. If you cannot utilize a pond, then try incorporating a fountain into your design.
  • Plants. When thinking of the plants that you will have in a Chinese garden, you need to think about the symbolism that is behind each of them. For example, a pine tree represents wisdom while bamboo represents strength and upright morality. However, there are also some traditional favorites as well. These favorites include plants like the Plum tree, and Chrysanthemums. These plants usually bloom later in the season, and help prolong the experience of the garden.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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