Pruning Cabbage

by Doris Donnerman
(last updated June 12, 2015)

Pruning cabbage can often be a confusing, and overwhelming task for many gardeners. After all, how exactly do you prune a plant that looks to be little more than a squat, undersized bush? In all actuality, it is possible to prune cabbage, though it often goes by a different name, which is garden thinning. Whether you call it thinning your garden, or pruning your cabbage, the basic principles and problems are the same though. Basically, you need to know the answers to the simple questions of when, how, and why to prune or thin your cabbage. Here are a few simple guidelines that can help you determine how you can go about pruning your cabbage, and actually determine whether you need to prune them at all.

  • When. Just as with any kind of pruning project, timing will play a key role in pruning your cabbage. Typically, you will not want to begin pruning or thinning your cabbage until after it first begins to blossom. What this means is that you will need to wait till you can determine which plants are blooming the best, and then remove those plants, or portions of plants. which are not blooming to your expectations.
  • How. Simply put, the easiest way to prune your cabbages is to simply remove those plants which are not blooming, or growing to your satisfaction. This technique is often referred to as thinning your garden. What you are basically doing is simply removing those plants which are not performing to your satisfaction. However, you can also prune your cabbages in the traditional manner. What this means is that you can simply remove the portions of the plants which are not performing to your satisfaction, by cutting those portions of the plant away from the rest. Keep in mind though that it is often much easier (and less time consuming) to use the thinning technique.
  • Why. The reason for pruning or thinning your cabbage is to help produce the best possible plants and harvest. When you remove plants, or portions of plants, which are not performing to your expectations, then you are actually promoting the growth of the healthy and productive plants. This works by promoting the plant to focus on the healthy portions, and direct its energy in a more productive manner. Likewise, you will be removing unnecessary competition for nutrients and moisture by removing those plants which are not up to your standards.

Author Bio

Doris Donnerman

Doris is a jack of all trades, writing on a variety of topics. Her articles have helped enlighten and entertain thousands over the years. ...

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