Storing Garden Tools

by April Reinhardt
(last updated June 28, 2019)

There is a tree in my front yard that has suckers that grow from the roots. The suckers grow straight up, and have reached embarrassing heights of sometimes four feet. I know for certain that I should cut the suckers when they sprout to one inch, since they are still tender, pliable, and easily cut at that height. Often, however, it is easier to watch the suckers grow than it is to find my long-handled pruners in a garage full of clutter. I have a peg board in our garage that houses all of my garden tools, but getting to the peg board is no easy feat since I have to navigate the obstacle course of empty boxes, spider-filled coolers, and garbage bags full of bubble wrap my husband insists will come in handy some day.

So, while I can stand against the far wall of the garage and look longingly to the other wall and see all of my garden tools lined up precisely on my pegboard, gleaming from the last time I cleaned them, I cannot get to them easily. I need to find a better way to store my garden tools. I know how to store them, I just need to find a more accessible place to store them, and then make the area husband-proof. Follow these guidelines for storing your garden tools:

  • Buy a large barrel or garbage can and store all of your rakes, shovels, long handled hoes, and brooms inside.
  • Install brackets and hang your ladders, wheelbarrows, and step ladders from them, on the inside of a tool shed or garage wall, freeing up floor space.
  • Use a peg board to hang your hand tools such as spades, weeding implements, hand shovels, pruners, and tree trimmers. Some people like to trace around the tools with a thick black marker once the tools are in place to remind them where to place them when they are finished using them.
  • Make sure that you clean your tools each time you use them. Dry them thoroughly before putting them away.
  • To prevent rust in between growing seasons, lightly oil your chrome and metal gardening tools with WD-40 or tool oil.
  • Use a case with shelves and locking doors to house your garden chemicals, fertilizers, weed spray, bug spray, and weedeater line.
  • Coil garden hose on coil reels to keep them off of the floor.

At the end of each growing season, inspect wooden handles for cracks, breaks, or splinters and replace the handle or the entire tool. Drain your lawnmower, garden tiller, and gas-powered weedeater of oil before storing them for the winter. Protect your children from harm by locking away chemicals, pesticides, and sharp tools.

Author Bio

April Reinhardt

An admin­istrator for a mutual fund man­age­ment firm, April deals with the writ­ten word daily. She loves to write and plans to author a memoir in the near future. April attend­ed More­head State Uni­ver­sity to pursue a BA degree in Ele­men­tary Edu­ca­tion. ...

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