Installing a Fence

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated September 3, 2014)

Simply put, fences are a great addition to just about any landscape. They can add a little extra security, as well as add some extra elegance, or privacy depending on the type that you choose. Installing a fence though is a great weekend project, and one that anyone can do. In fact, if you are interested in having a fence around your property, installing it yourself can save a lot of money. However, be aware that it will take some effort on your part.

This article will not describe how to install every kind of fence imaginable. What it will do instead is discuss how to install many of the post style fences that are out there. Keep in mind that many fencing kits will come with their own instructions, so be sure that you have familiarized yourself with them. If there is any conflict between these instructions, and the instructions listed by the manufacturer, then be sure to follow the ones from the manufacturer.

  1. Get any paperwork. Many local communities require that you get some permits to do any type of exterior building work. Before you begin doing any work on your fence, check with your local zoning office, and make sure you get the proper permits if necessary.
  2. Stake out, and get measurements. Use some twine, and some simple stakes to mark out where you want your fence to go. Once you have marked out the proposed fence area, get some measurements. This will tell you how much material you will need to complete the fence. Write the measurements down on a piece of paper.
  3. Get the materials. Go to your local home improvement store, and pick out a style of fence. Purchase enough fencing materials to fulfill the dimensions that you have listed. In fact, it would be best to get a little more than you think you will need, just to be on the safe side.
  4. Mark the gate. Choose the spot where you will want your gate to be, and mark it appropriately. Using some post hole diggers, dig a couple of post holes for the gate to go into.
  5. Mark the posts. Start at one end of your fence line, and go around marking where you will want your posts. On the average, each post hole should be about four to five feet apart, and should be about one foot deep. Once you have marked the post holes, go back and begin digging the holes.
  6. Mix some concrete. In a large wheelbarrow begin mixing the concrete that you will use as a foundation for the posts. Have a friend help you take the concrete around to the different post holes.
  7. Place the posts. Have a friend place and hold the posts in each of the holes as you pour the concrete. The posts should be able to stand straight up with the help of the concrete, but if necessary use some additional guide posts and twine to hold the posts straight. Allow the concrete to cure overnight before finishing the project.
  8. Assemble the fence. Once the concrete has cured overnight, it is time to begin assembling the rest of the fence. At this point, follow the directions specific for your type of fence. Usually all you will need to do is attach each panel of the fence to the posts. Do not forget to attach the gate to the opening you marked out earlier.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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