Identifying Plants for a Winter Garden

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated October 1, 2013)

Instead of letting your garden sit idle during the winter months, why not try to have a wonderland that everyone will enjoy? While it is entirely possible to do this, there will be some work that you will have to do to make it that way. First and foremost among the tasks is identifying plants for a winter garden in your area. Here is a list of some of the more common plants that you can use.

  • Gaanthus nivalis. Also known more commonly as Snowdrops, the Galanthus nivalis will, can often begin growing through layers of snow well before other plants are even thinking about doing that. Generally speaking these plants are rather small, white colored, bell shaped, and somewhat delicate in appearance. These plants typically grow between six and ten inches, require well drained soil, need to be kept moist, and prefer colder climates. They will typically grow best in zones two through seven.
  • Acer palmatum. If you are looking for a tree that can add a bit of color to your winter garden, and are willing to turn to trees, you may want to look at the Japanese maple tree. These beautiful deciduous trees can grow to a whopping 25 feet high and 15 feet wide, though there are several smaller (i.e., dwarf) varieties that you can also choose from. During the transition months between fall and winter, this tree can provide a beautiful splash of color. Be careful that you plant the tree in loamy soil that isn't all that wet, and has a pH level between 3.7 and 6.5. These trees do well in a narrower growing band, so be sure that you are between zones five and eight.
  • Helleborus. Traditionally known as hellebores, this plant is one that doesn't need all that much attention to grow well, and often begins to bloom earlier than many other plants. It is an evergreen perennial that can grow quite well from zones four to eight, needs well-drained soil, and simply loves the full winter sun. That being said, during the warmer months you will want to provide some shade during the afternoon. Be sure that you also keep the plants fairly moist.

Now that you know what some of the more popular winter garden plants are, you can begin picking and choosing a little better. Keep in mind that once you have a few plants in mind for your winter garden, you are not yet finished. You still need to see if those plants will be able to thrive not only in your growing zone, but also in the general area of your home. This means that you will need to properly prepare your garden for growing, in addition to identifying plants for a winter garden.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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