When to Use Cuttings

by Brooke Tolman
(last updated March 25, 2016)

Plant cutting is so easy and is the solution to many of the common everyday houseplant problems. Here are some times when it's best to not only use, but also grow plant cuttings:

  • When you're out of money. Plants can be expensive, so when your running low on money using cuttings to grow new plants would be a good idea. Buying extra soil and rummaging around your house for an extra container to put it in is definitely cheaper than buying a whole new plant.
  • In the summertime. Summertime is the ideal time to take cuttings from most plants, especially perennials. Be aware that taking cuttings doesn't work for every plant. While many root readily, others need more coaxing, and some are impossible. Grab the pruning shears, the pots and the soil, and head out into the garden to see what you can cut.
  • When you need to prune. If your going to be pruning your plants anyways, why not put some use what your pruning off instead of just trashing them. Instead of just going at the plant with the pruning shears, cut carefully so that you can use the cuttings to make new plants. They are great to help fill in bare spots in your garden or plant inside.
  • In the morning. Morning time is also the best time to take cuttings. The plants are at their freshest because they've just had a whole nights worth of growing and haven't been dried-out from the sun. If you plan on taking cuttings, plan ahead and water a bunch a couple days before so that you know the plant is in top condition.
  • When you can tell your plants are starting to die. If you can tell your plants are getting unhealthy and your not sure how to go about saving them, use a cutting and just grow a new plant. It's a simple solution to a very common problem among houseplants. If you can tell part of your plant is diseased and are not sure how to cure it, take a cutting from the healthy portion and plant it to grow a new plant. It's easier than trying to get rid of the disease most often.

Author Bio

Brooke Tolman

Brooke is a graduate of Brigham Young University with a Bachelors of Science degree in Exercise Science. She currently resides in Seattle where she works as a freelance data analyst and personal trainer. She hopes to spend her life camping and traveling the world. ...

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