Using Sod to Patch Lawn Spots

by April Reinhardt
(last updated May 31, 2017)

Several summers ago we had temperatures with sustained highs of over 100 degrees every day for 60 days. As a result, many lawns in our neighborhood were burned from the high heat. Three seasons later, I still have bald spots in my lawn.

There are myriad reasons why a lawn could develop lawn spots, such as sustained high temperatures that burn the grass or urine from animals such as rodents, dogs, or cats. Perhaps you've set objects on your grass, such as firewood, a burn barrel, trash cans, a wheelbarrow, or a tent. Leaving those types of things on your lawn will retard the growth of the grass underneath, causing lawn spots. Or perhaps you've become overzealous with fertilizer, spilled chemicals, or had a construction project that caused lawn deterioration. Mother Nature may have left her calling card on your lawn, causing lawn spots through weather damage, lawn diseases, or insects that cause spotty lawn destruction.

Whatever the reason your lawn has spots, you might want to consider using sod to patch them. Here are some tips for using sod to patch your lawn spots:

  • Visit local nurseries or home improvements stores in your area to determine which ones sell small pieces of sod just for the purpose of patching a lawn. Try to match the lawn as closely as possible with the sod piece or plug.
  • Keep in mind that when you use pieces of sod in your lawn as patches, that they may end up looking out of place. That's why it's so important to try to match the type and color of grass as closely as possible. If you don't then the patch will end up looking like a patch all the time.
  • Prepare the lawn spot by cutting a square shape around the damaged spot. Make sure that the shape is as square as possible when you've finished cutting. Use a sharp spade to remove the damaged lawn, removing about one inch of soil with it.
  • Make sure that the sod you are laying is the same size as the sod piece you removed. Before you lay the new piece, use a rake to roughen the spot beneath, and then tamp the new piece into place. Make sure that it establishes good contact with the soil below.

For the first few weeks, water the new sod until the roots have established themselves into the soil below. Every few days, gently lift a corner to visually inspect for root growth. Once the sod is resistant to being pulled up, then you know the roots have been established firmly.

Author Bio

April Reinhardt

An admin­istrator for a mutual fund man­age­ment firm, April deals with the writ­ten word daily. She loves to write and plans to author a memoir in the near future. April attend­ed More­head State Uni­ver­sity to pursue a BA degree in Ele­men­tary Edu­ca­tion. ...

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